2030 The Beatles’ Seventh Christmas Record – The Beatles (1969)

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The Beatles’ Seventh Christmas Record.

This spoken word record was written by The Beatles in 1969. It was recorded by The Beatles in 1969 and was produced by Kenny Everett. The recordings were made in various locations in England including Ascot, Weybridge, St. John’s Wood and the Apple Studios. The recording was released as a 7″ flexi disc on the Lyntone label and was only available to members of The Beatles’ fan club. The front cover uses a photograph taken by Ringo Starr while the back cover uses drawings by his son Zak Starkey. Zak Starkey can also be heard at the beginning of the recording. The back cover mentions the Plastic Ono Band’s’ 1969 single Give Peace A Chance. The recording is largely made up of interviews, comedy skits, and songs recorded by John Lennon and Yoko Ono at Tittenhurst Park in Ascot. The recording includes a snippet of The Beatles’ 1969 song The End and an a cappella version of Good King Wenceslas performed by John Lennon. The recording also includes extracts from the original songs Good Evening To You Gentlemen (sung by Ringo Starr), This Is To Wish You A Merry, Merry Christmas (sung by Paul McCartney) and Merry Christmas (sung by John Lennon and Yoko Ono). The recording also includes instrumental versions of The First Noel and While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks recorded by unidentified performers.The Beatles’ Seventh Christmas Record was the last recording released by The Beatles’ during the 1960s.

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2008 The End – The Beatles (1969)

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The Beatles.

The End was written by Paul McCartney but is credited to Lennon-McCartney. It was first recorded by The Beatles in 1969. It was recorded at EMI Studios and was produced by George Martin. It was released on The Beatles’ 1969 album Abbey Road. A remix was released on The Beatles’ 1996 album Anthology 3. A snippet of the song was used in The Beatles’ Seventh Christmas Record from 1969. The song was part of Paul McCartney’s repertoire. He performed the song as part of a medley along with Golden Slumbers and Carry That Weight. A live version was released on Tripping The Live Fantastic in 1990. Paul McCartney has also performed the song as a medley along with Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise). Live versions of that medley have been released on Back In The U.S. (2002), Back In The World (2003), and Good Evening New York City (2009).

Now Hear This: The Beatles’ Seventh Christmas Record – The Beatles (1969)
Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight/The End – Paul McCartney (1990)
The End (remix) – The Beatles (1996)
Sgt. Pepper’s/The End – Paul McCartney (2002
Sgt. Pepper’s/The End – Paul McCartney (2003)
Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band /The End – Paul McCartney (2009)

2007 Carry That Weight – The Beatles (1969)

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Paul McCartney.

This song was written by Paul McCartney but is credited to Lennon-McCartney. Part of the song uses the tune to The Beatles 1969 song You Never Give Me Your Money. It was first recorded by The Beatles in 1969. It was produced by George Martin and was released on The Beatles’ 1969 album Abbey Road. The song is part of Paul McCartney’s repertoire. He has played it as part of a medley with Golden Slumbers and The End. A live version was released on the 1990 album Tripping The Live Fantastic. Paul McCartney has also performed the song as part of a medley along with You Never Give Me Your Money. Live versions of that medley have been released on Back In The U.S. (2002) and Back In The World (2003).

Now Hear This: You Never Give Me Your Money – The Beatles (1969)
Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight/The End – Paul McCartney (1990)
Carry That Weight – Paul McCartney (2002)
Carry That Weight – Paul McCartney (2003)

1803 In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida – Iron Butterfly (1968)

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Iron Butterfly.

This song was written by Doug Ingle and was first recorded by Iron Butterfly in 1968. The song is over seventeen minutes long and was first released on the album In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida. An edited version, lasting under three minutes was released as a single in 1968. The B-side was Iron Butterfly Theme. The drumming on In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida influenced Ringo Starr’s drumming on The Beatles’ 1969 song The End.

Now Hear This : The End – The Beatles (1969)